Anyone know who this is? I’ve seen him a million times but can’t think of the name.

Anyone know who this is? I’ve seen him a million times but can’t think of the name.


Soviet Veteran
World War II veteran from Belarus Knostantin Pronin, 86, sits on a bench as he waits in hopes of finding other men from his unit at Gorky park during Victory Day in Moscow, Russia, May 9, 2011.
This picture made me sad. To think that there will be a few less friends from your unit until that one year you’re the last one, just waiting.

Soviet Veteran

World War II veteran from Belarus Knostantin Pronin, 86, sits on a bench as he waits in hopes of finding other men from his unit at Gorky park during Victory Day in Moscow, Russia, May 9, 2011.

This picture made me sad. To think that there will be a few less friends from your unit until that one year you’re the last one, just waiting.


Real deal…
These 3 rifles are owned by a well known Dragunov collector. Rifle at the top with the polymer handguard is a KBI import; the only company that sold genuine Russian SVD’s on the civilian market. Very rare; last one I saw sold for $18,000. Center rifle is a real non-import Russian SVD. Some examples manage to make it into the U.S as war trophies. Bottom rife is the Chinese copy, the NDM-86, which was also sold in the U.S but appeared in two calibers; 7.62x54R and 7.62x51.
One other note; the NDM-86 has a different finish compared to it’s Russian counterparts. The Chinese used a black, somewhat shiny enamel finish on these rifles. Also, the factory supplied optics on the NDM are black, whereas the KBI imports and most Russian SVD’s have the gray scopes.

Real deal…

These 3 rifles are owned by a well known Dragunov collector. Rifle at the top with the polymer handguard is a KBI import; the only company that sold genuine Russian SVD’s on the civilian market. Very rare; last one I saw sold for $18,000. Center rifle is a real non-import Russian SVD. Some examples manage to make it into the U.S as war trophies. Bottom rife is the Chinese copy, the NDM-86, which was also sold in the U.S but appeared in two calibers; 7.62x54R and 7.62x51.

One other note; the NDM-86 has a different finish compared to it’s Russian counterparts. The Chinese used a black, somewhat shiny enamel finish on these rifles. Also, the factory supplied optics on the NDM are black, whereas the KBI imports and most Russian SVD’s have the gray scopes.

fmj556x45:

izveshk

fmj556x45:

izveshk

RPD, next to an RPK. The RPD was the LMG that served prior to the RPK being designed and implemented. It fed from a drum containing a non-desintegrating belt. Kind of like the SKS it never saw a lot of use with the Russians, but they have popped up on battlefields around the world.

RPD, next to an RPK. The RPD was the LMG that served prior to the RPK being designed and implemented. It fed from a drum containing a non-desintegrating belt. Kind of like the SKS it never saw a lot of use with the Russians, but they have popped up on battlefields around the world.

Check this bad boy out. Tula Arsenal AKM.

Check this bad boy out. Tula Arsenal AKM.

Russian soldier, looks like VDV or marine, with an underfolding AK.

Russian soldier, looks like VDV or marine, with an underfolding AK.

operator-as-fuck:

Happy 65th birthday to the “Badguy Gun”

In July 6th 1947 the first Type 1A Avtomat Kalashnikov model 47 rolled of the production line and changed the face of the world. 

Since that day in 1947 hundreds of variants of the AK have been made all around the world. Whether there in the hands of a nations oppressors or of the nations saviors the rifkle has seen the most combat of any other weapon in the world.

photos- 

Top~ AK-47 prototype

Left mid~ AK-47 type 1a

Right mid~ AK-47 type 2b

Bottom~ The AK platforms diversity